Welcome to the webpage for the ADNEX risk model to diagnose ovarian cancer

The ADNEX risk model can be used by medical doctors to diagnose ovarian cancer in women who have at least one persistent adnexal (ovarian, para-ovarian, and tubal) tumour and are considered to require surgery. ADNEX estimates the probability that an adnexal tumour is benign, borderline, stage I cancer, stage II-IV cancer, or secondary metastatic cancer (i.e. metastasis of non-adnexal cancer to the ovary). The model was developed by clinicians and statisticians from the International Ovarian Tumour Analysis (IOTA) group, and is based on clinical and ultrasound data from almost 6000 women recruited at 24 centres in 10 countries (Italy, Belgium, Sweden, Czech Republic, Poland, France, UK, China, Spain, and Canada).

The ADNEX paper uses nine predictors. There are three clinical variables, age, serum CA-125 level, and type of centre (oncology referral centre vs other), and six ultrasound variables, maximal diameter of lesion, proportion of solid tissue, more than 10 cyst locules, number of papillary projections, acoustic shadows, and ascites. All patients included required surgery as judged by a local clinician. As with all current diagnostic models for adnexal tumours (e.g. IOTA models, RMI, ROMA) it implies that patients selected for expectant management were excluded.

The manuscript describing the model is published in the BMJ, and we append the abstract of the paper below.1

The ADNEX model is implemented electronically in various formats:

  1. App for Android – Available on Google Play
  2. App for iPhone – Available on iTunes
  3. Web application

1. Van Calster B, Van Hoorde K, Valentin L, Testa AC, Fischerova D, Van Holsbeke C, Savelli L, Franchi D, Epstein E, Kaijser J, Van Belle V, Czekierdowski A, Guerriero S, Fruscio R, Lanzani C, Scala F, Bourne T, Timmerman D. Evaluating the risk of ovarian cancer before surgery using the ADNEX model to differentiate between benign, borderline, early and advanced stage invasive, and secondary metastatic tumours: prospective multicentre diagnostic study. The BMJ 2014;349:g5920.

Abstract

Objectives

To develop a risk prediction model to preoperatively discriminate between benign, borderline, stage I invasive, stage II-IV invasive, and secondary metastatic ovarian tumours.

Design

Observational diagnostic study using prospectively collected clinical and ultrasound data.

Setting

24 ultrasound centres in 10 countries.

Participants

Women with an ovarian (including para-ovarian and tubal) mass and who underwent a standardised ultrasound examination before surgery. The model was developed on 3506 patients recruited between 1999 and 2007, temporally validated on 2403 patients recruited between 2009 and 2012, and then updated on all 5909 patients.

Main outcome measures

Histological classification and surgical staging of the mass.

Results

The Assessment of Different NEoplasias in the adneXa (ADNEX) model contains three clinical and six ultrasound predictors: age, serum CA-125 level, type of centre (oncology centres v other hospitals), maximum diameter of lesion, proportion of solid tissue, more than 10 cyst locules, number of papillary projections, acoustic shadows, and ascites. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the classic discrimination between benign and malignant tumours was 0.94 (0.93 to 0.95) on temporal validation. The AUC was 0.85 for benign versus borderline, 0.92 for benign versus stage I cancer, 0.99 for benign versus stage II-IV cancer, and 0.95 for benign versus secondary metastatic. AUCs between malignant subtypes varied between 0.71 and 0.95, with an AUC of 0.75 for borderline versus stage I cancer and 0.82 for stage II-IV versus secondary metastatic. Calibration curves showed that the estimated risks were accurate.

Conclusions

The ADNEX model discriminates well between benign and malignant tumours and offers fair to excellent discrimination between four types of ovarian malignancy. The use of ADNEX has the potential to improve triage and management decisions and so reduce morbidity and mortality associated with adnexal pathology.